Sick and Tired of Your Art Business? Here’s How to End the Frustration, Organize and Grow.

sickntired

End the Frustration of Creative Business Building!

I’m in bed.  Let’s rephrase that.  I’m STILL in bed.  Been here since yesterday afternoon after I confirmed I was going to a Halloween party. As soon as I hit “send” I realized I was pushing myself and decided it was best for me if I stopped.  Just stopped.

I’m rarely am sick, thank goodness.  But because there’s usually not anything physically wrong with me, nothing to stop me from stopping myself as I mentioned in my other post, my own desire to calm down and breathe are my personal “speed bumps”. However, since my body decided to stop itself yesterday, I am listening.

Being sick and tired seems to be all too prevalent. I speak to many clients who take on too much or don’t have the ability to organize their lives successfully. They sound SO stressed and their frantic emails the night before our session share with me just how much they are taking on and how frazzled they truly are. It seems to be an epidemic in our technologically advanced society and it’s not healthy.  Saying to someone, “I’m SO busy” like it’s a badge of honor just makes you sound overwhelmed and no one wants to work with someone who doesn’t have time for their project or relationship.

Since I’m here to help and I’m not doing much right now but drinking tea, let’s look at a few ways to keep YOU from being sick and tired and build a stronger small business.

1. Organize your time better. Use a calendar (paper or electronic or both) and if you can set up categories (home, sales, marketing, client…) do, so that you can see what’s sucking up the most of your time.

2.  Know your rhythm and accept your schedule. Not a morning person? Then don’t set morning as your busiest time. Have after school activities with your family? Plan to do a work while you’re waiting for dance class to let out. Not a good sleeper? Set aside some easier work to do when you’re up at night.

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3. Listen to your body. It will tell you when its had enough.  Aches, pains, sniffles means, “slow down” or “stop”. Do you best to rest when you can and give yourself a break. You aren’t worth much to anyone if you’re not your best and no one wants be around you when you’re sick.

4. Say “no”.  Don’t overwhelm yourself because you’re a nice person and can’t say no to anyone. Practice saying “no”. “No thank you.” “Nope.”  Make sure you don’t apologize.  Don’t add an “I’m sorry” to it. And you don’t owe anyone a reason why you’re saying no.  Plus if you tell them, you’re giving them an excellent opportunity to try to “fix” your problem by suggesting ways around your “no”.  Just say “no”.

5. Prioritize. Not everything is an emergency.  Not everything has to be done “now”. Make your master to do list and rearrange by priority making sure you’re giving yourself enough time to do each project with the time you have.

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6. Get help. Hire a VA (virtual assistant) or part-time employee or intern.  People are looking for work and you need help, it’s a good fit.  Maybe there’s a nearby college who has a work/credit program where their students work for school credit.

I’m happy I spent the weekend in bed and declined to go to the event tonight. Even though they’re probably having a blast and making important connections, I’m healing my body and honoring myself while trusting the Universe to send me what I need when I need it.

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